KIRAS Security Research

2017

KIF

High-secure long-term cryptography for wireless communication using channel characteristics

The project KIF researches quantum-computer secure cryptographic methods for key management and to ensure object authenticity and data integrity. The methods should be applicable for short-range as well as long-range communication. 

Highly secure cryptography is a topic of increasing concern, especially in the digital age with globalization in an unprecedented scale. Moreover, with internet of things growing very fast a completely new huge market has been opened for secure communication. This is a topic of great importance especially when it comes to autonomous driving where manipulated communication could result in fatalities. As transport infrastructure is built to long-term, there are also high demands for cryptography as well as all other utilized technology. However, in order to guarantee a long-term high level of security, current asymmetric cryptographic algorithms are not suitable.  

As a result, physical methods and post-quantum cryptographic algorithms are topic of growing importance within cryptography. Although quantum cryptography is an excellent replacement ensuring the necessary security, it is very expensive and not suitable for autonomous driving due to the vast amount of objects. For the last couple of years research has been concerned with new physical methods for generating and distributing cryptographic keys by utilizing high-frequency radio communication. It is relying on the reciprocity of the communication channel. This approach also comes with drawbacks, especially on the topics of a reasonably high key entropy, eavesdropping, object-authenticity and communications over a bigger distance. 

The project KIF researches quantum-computer secure cryptographic methods to generate and distribute cryptographic keys using wireless channel characteristics and to ensure object authenticity and data integrity utilizing post-quantum cryptographic algorithms. The methods should be applicable for short-range as well as long-range wireless communication.

Project Coordinator
Institute of IT Security Research, St. Poelten University of Applied Sciences 

Further Project Partners
Cryptas it-Security GmbH
Federal Ministry for Europe, Integration and Foreign Affairs
ASFINAG Autobahnen- und Schnellstraßenfinanzierungs-AG (LoI)
Ministry of Defence and Sports (LoI)

Contact
Univ.-Doz. DI. Dr. Ernst Piller
Institute of IT Security Research
St. Poelten University of Applied Sciences  
Matthias Corvinus-Straße 15,
3100 St. Pölten

+43 2742 313 228 – 636
ernst.piller@fhstp.ac.at 
https://ifs.fhstp.ac.at 

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